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Am I 1.5?

Question:
I was diagnosed late September as Type 2 and put on Metformin. It didn't work well for me, so the doctor kept increasing the dose (up to 500mg 4x/day). It still wasn't working, and I couldn't stand the gastro-intestinal problems, so I stopped taking it. My numbers haven't changed much since I stopped (maybe a few more spikes, but mostly 150-180 range). I'm eating low carb and hoping they will continue coming down (diagnosed at 326 at the end of Sept).
Anyway, I don't have any of the usual signs of insulin resistance; BP, lipids, etc. all normal. I'm only about 10 pounds overweight. My problem seems to be low insulin rather than insulin resistance. Does that make me a type 1.5? My doctor isn't knowledgable about diabetes and I had to convince him to even run a A1c (9.8 at diagnosis); I doubt I could get him to run fancy tests. Does it matter what type I am in terms of treatment if I can't get it down with diet and exercise? I don't think the Metformin worked for me.
Answers:
Originally Posted by Lynnw I was diagnosed late September as Type 2 and put on Metformin. It didn't work well for me, so the doctor kept increasing the dose (up to 500mg 4x/day). It still wasn't working, and I couldn't stand the gastro-intestinal problems, so I stopped taking it. My numbers haven't changed much since I stopped (maybe a few more spikes, but mostly 150-180 range). I'm eating low carb and hoping they will continue coming down (diagnosed at 326 at the end of Sept).
Anyway, I don't have any of the usual signs of insulin resistance; BP, lipids, etc. all normal. I'm only about 10 pounds overweight. My problem seems to be low insulin rather than insulin resistance. Does that make me a type 1.5? My doctor isn't knowledgable about diabetes and I had to convince him to even run a A1c (9.8 at diagnosis); I doubt I could get him to run fancy tests. Does it matter what type I am in terms of treatment if I can't get it down with diet and exercise? I don't think the Metformin worked for me. If you were just diagnosed at the end of September, it may just be too early to tell whether metformin works and what kind of diabetic you are. It took me six months to bring me down initially after diagnosis with metformin, and I was following the diet. My blood sugar readings were higher than yours even after six months. It was only after a year with a much lower carb diet that I was able to get down to consistently hit blood sugar targets. It is too short a time to tell whether metformin works or not. It can take 6-8 weeks to be effective. I know that sometimes you can have gastric distress, but don't give up to easily. Metformin has helped many people and is really quite safe. Many people find that over time the gastric distress diminishes.
In my case, I found that metformin did not work by starting metformin for a period of 3-6 months and then stopping and observing no changes in my blood sugar control. I did this more than once in order to fully demonstrate that it did not work.
I would encourage you to be diligent about your diet and exercise and see if you can bring your blood sugar under control. If you are really a type 1.5, your condition will make itself apparent. The situation you describe is not all that different than mine, it can just take some time for the medication to take effect, to learn to low carb and for the effects to become apparent. Have some faith. You are doing the right things.
Answers:
The one thing I know is your a1c is pretty high. Metformin takes time to work but if your a 1.5 to early to tell. There are numerous oral meds that are cheap for $4.00 a month that do a good job. I know many want to go the all natural way and God bless them if they can do it. The thing is that the a1c is to high and if it stays there much longer damage is going to be done. I would have to speak with the doc and let them know what your problems and feelings are.
Answers:
Originally Posted by furball64801 The one thing I know is your a1c is pretty high. Metformin takes time to work but if your a 1.5 to early to tell. There are numerous oral meds that are cheap for $4.00 a month that do a good job. I know many want to go the all natural way and God bless them if they can do it. The thing is that the a1c is to high and if it stays there much longer damage is going to be done. I would have to speak with the doc and let them know what your problems and feelings are. That A1c (9.8) was done when I was first diagnosed. My blood sugar at the time was 326 and probably had been high for a while. I keep my mostly under 200 now, so my next A1c will be better. If I can get it down to normal and keep it there, I'd like to stay off medication as long as possible.
Answers:
My HbA1c was similar to yours 2 years ago. I do low carb and take metformin 850, 3 x a day. It does take a while to get used to. Have you tried the extended version? It is a little gentler on the stomach. If your doc doesn't know much about diabetes I would suggest you find an internist or an . Diabetes is a chronic disease and you need to be seen by someone who understands it. You say you are doing low carb, how low carb are you doing? I had similar numbers to you and then I cut my carbs further to 10-15 per meal and began to see a lot lower numbers. So much of diabetes is trial and error. I think most people that are classified as 1.5 are usually on insulin. If you go to Blood Sugar 101,
she gives you a good description of the different types of diabetes. Since you are newly 'd I think you need to give it more time to see if it works. It took me over 2 years to get my level of metformin correct.
Answers:
Dear Lynnw
Who cares what type what is clearly obvious that you need to be on insulin IMMEDIATELY. You need a slow release insulin like Lantus ( twice a day is better than once a day) to cover the basic body needs it is called basal insulin. And a fast acting insulin before meals called bolus in latin. Usually the fast start with novo.......... I don't know how you get this with a unknowledgeable doctor.
Answers:
Even the most unknowledgeable doctor can order an insulin test. This will tell you where you are in producing insulin. It is not a sophisicated test. At least it will give you some kind of idea if you are not producing enough or too much which it doesn't sound like. Ask for a copy of the test when it is completed, results are generaly fast. Keeping your blood sugar mostly under 200 is still way too high.
I agree with Jeanne if the regular met did not agree with you ask for a script for the extended release. It is kinder on the stomach.
Answers:
Hi Lynn,
Have you considered switching doctors to someone more knowledgeable? I sort of agree with CalgaryDiabetic, I think you might have to go into insulin. Consistent levels of >200 CANNOT be good for you.
Good luck!
Answers:
Originally Posted by andreapuig Hi Lynn,
Have you considered switching doctors to someone more knowledgeable? I sort of agree with CalgaryDiabetic, I think you might have to go into insulin. Consistent levels of >200 CANNOT be good for you.
Good luck! I strongly believe in the body's ability to heal itself, given the chance. Maybe every newly diagnosed diabetic thinks this, but I"ve got to give it a shot, and I don't believe that the body can heal while taking toxic chemicals. I've read dozens of books and countless articles on diabetes. Even insulin, a substance naturally occuring in the the body, was never meant to be injected directly into the blood. In the body, insulin goes from the pancreas to the liver, where the liver takes at least half of the insulin produced. A very small amount then goes into the bloodstream. When you inject insulin, you must inject enough to meet the needs of the liver (or you develop ketoacidosis), but that means hyperinsulinism in the rest of the body. Peripheral high insulin levels can cause all sorts of problems, including damage to the small blood vessels. It also produces new fat cells that then require more insulin and leads to a vicious cycle. Type 1's obviously have no choice, but if there's a chance I can restore my pancreas to full working order, I'm going to do it.
It's been well documented that beta cells regenerate themselves, but in the auto-immune types of diabetes they are killed off as fast as they are created. In the other types of diabetes...well, it isn't well studied exactly what happens. I believe that given the right diet and supplements, diabetes can be reversed. It's fairly well known that there are vitamin and mineral deficiencies and conditions in the body (too much acidity) that lead to pancreas damage, and these can be corrected with alkalyzing diet and supplementing the missing substances, giving the body the building blocks to repair itself.
Has anyone read Death to Diabetes? DeWayne McCulley didn't even know he had a problem until he ended up in the hospital in a coma with over 1300. He wasn't expected to live. Of course with readings that high, he was put on insulin, but weaned himself off of it in 4 months. Today his average is 95 and his A1c is under 5 with no medication. Obviously he maintains his diet (protein, fat and lots of non-starchy vegetables...actually more carbs worth of veggies than I eat per meal) or he'd be back where he was. My philosophy has always been that if one person can do it, anyone can, and I'm starting out a LOT healthier than he was (he also had high blood pressure and sky-high lipids...mine are normal).
I'd also recommend that people read Victory over Diabetes by William Philpott and Dwight Kalita. It's an older book, so it doesn't include any of the newer information, but it is still fascinating, and still makes sense after reading all the newest research. I think that's the test of a good theory; the new research findings drop right into place. They see diabetes (type 2) as a form of intolerance to foods and other substances. They believe it's the faulty exocrine functions of the pancreas that are causing the problems...in case after case, when they supplied the enzymes, amino acids, and bicarb, they could keep normal; the same meals without these supplements caused spikes. This 'intolerance' also causes chronic inflammation that damages organs. I certainly found that when I stopped eating grains, my chronic inflammation subsided. I believe that I'm still suffering from the damage done by years of low-grade chronic inflammation. I don't know how long it will take or even if all the damage can be reversed, but I have faith in the healing power of the body once the damaging substances are taken away....in my case high carbs, and especially grain.
Yeah, I suppose a lot of people are rolling their eyes or laughing at me, but how many have seriously tried to heal themselves? The supplements I'm taking (and I've thoroughly researched everything I take) do no harm and have been shown (scientifically or anecdotaly) to help strengthen/support the various functions. High blood sugar is a symptom; I'm trying to fix the root problem. I can't say the same for any medication I've read about. Metformin is one of the better ones, but anything that creates such toxic substances that it will kill you (lactic acidosis) if your kidneys don't get rid of it quickly is something I hesitate to put in my body.
My blood sugar was over 300 when I was diagnosed, and had probably been that way for a while...I figure that taking another month or two trying to get it down to normal isn't doing that much more damage. I believe that it is the medications that make it a progressive disease; they force the body to work without healing it, so eventually one system after another burns out. I'd like to avoid the medication route for as long as possible. If I can't do it on my own, I will go back to Metformin.
Answers:
My doctor didn't mince words. All the nurses were dancing around us at our first visit telling us it won't be so bad but the doc just said you have to use insulin to get it down. I was crushed but got the down right away and it kept me out of the hospital. I've gained a more healthy respect now for his no nonsense approach.
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