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BROWN Rice vs. WHITE Rice (GRAPH)?

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So there you go -- choose brown rice over white rice and you've brought down your starch intake by 8%. But I'm sure most people who eat brown rice think they're bringing it down by 30%, or even 50%.

That's the trouble with qualitative rather than quantitative recommendations. If you say that people with diabetes should choose brown rice over white rice (or, more likely, that people with diabetes should "eat more brown rice"), the impression created is that the difference between the two kinds of rice must be dramatic. But it isn't, unless an 8% difference is your idea of drama.
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Tom that is part of the problem in treating type 2 like you can eat all those foods, many of us cant eat them good point.
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Wow Tom! What a brilliant observation. I really thought about what you're saying and it's so true. When people are told that one type of food is better than another or told to eat more of a particular food, they tend to think the difference is dramatic. Makes ya think who the messenger is.

Unfortunately, people won't do the research themselves or, well..it was in the news so the message must be true! I know...I've become very jaded.
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Brown rice is ranked low on the glycemic index.
White rice is ranked high on the glycemic index.

Low foods release their glucose more slowly into the blood stream. This means that, for most people, a serving of brown rice will impact their BS level much less than the same amount of white rice. Eating too much of any carbohydrate-containing food can be problematic. That's why it is important to test and see how your blood sugar reacts to different food choices. We can still enjoy many of the foods we love as long as we understand how our body responds to them and adjust our serving size accordingly.
Janis
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Hi:

No comment on rice. I don't eat it at all. I do not mean to be impolite nor am I implying anything, but is the moderator a diabetic? Janis if you read this please post your status? You wrote the above post in an ambigious way partly in the second person, making it sound like you are or may be one of us.

yours,
Craig
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The "low" and "high" ranges of the glycemic index are not as far apart as most people imagine, so I think it gives a false impression to say that brown rice is "low", and white rice is "high", and brown rice has "much less" impact than white rice.

The glycemic index web site I checked listed brown rice as 50 and white rice as 69. That difference may be significant, but it's considerably smaller than the difference most people will expect based on comparative terms such as "low" and "high" and "much less".

Maybe 50 and 69 aren't the right values (I'm sure someone else has measured these things differently), but it seems doubtful that there is the kind of night-and-day difference between brown rice and white rice which the terms "low" and "high" suggest.
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I believe Jennie Brand-Miller is one of the GI "experts" who has been quoted on this site - the book that I have by her says of brown rice "all varieties tested to date have a high GI" and that Uncle Ben's converted WHITE rice has the lowest GI, at 38. Which all goes to show, I think, that it is an inexact science and that all rice is made of starch.
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Hi Craig,
I had gestational diabetes, which puts me at significant risk for developing diabetes (I still suffer from BS swings), have a family history of diabetes, and am married to someone with type 2 diabetes. Because of my personal history and my home life, I must practice what I preach.
Janis
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The "low" and "high" distinctions make a significant difference in how most people respond. Johanna Burhani, RD, CDE, a colleague of Jennie Brand-Miller and author of the bestselling book, Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, explains the differences by using the terms "gushers" and "tricklers." Foods that fall into the low range are "tricklers." Their glucose trickles slowly into the blood stream. Those in the high range are "gushers" - their glucose gushes into the blood stream and causes spiking to occur. The behaviors of these foods are quite different. Those that fall in-between are listed as "medium."

Again, each person must learn how he or she responds. The GI is only a guide. The amount of starch isn't as important because foods that contain the same amount of starch can behave quite differently.
Janis
Diabetes Mellitus Type
Diabetes Nursing

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